Our goals

We are working towards a bigger, bolder Canada:

  • 100 million people by 2100
  • A vibrant, expanding, inclusive and resilient economy
  • An ability to afford compassionate social programs and essential infrastructure
  • Global relevance and influence

We will achieve these goals by leading, enabling and partnering on initiatives that support long-term thinking and planning in five key focus areas: immigration, urban development & infrastructure investment, employment and entrepreneurship, early childhood supports, and education.

In addition to measuring Canada’s progress towards these outcomes through our National Scorecard, we are also measuring our own organizational impact.

Look for a detailed impact report in 2021.

Our focus areas

Each focus area links directly to successfully establishing a bigger and more diverse Canada with a strong economy and social infrastructure:

Immigration

Without immigration, Canada’s population will start to shrink in twenty years. As a result, it is not a question of whether, but how much immigration is appropriate. Canada already has a large number of immigrants, who are a source of economic strength and diversity. Our openness as a country is a competitive advantage, and it must remain that way for decades to come.

Facts
source

Historically, Canada has successfully supported very high levels of immigration. In 1913, 400,000 immigrants arrived in Canada, representing over 5.2% of the population at the time.

Source:

Statistics Canada. “An Aging Population.” Canada Yearbook, 2010.

Immigrants to Canada are more likely to start and own businesses than those born in Canada.

Source:

Statistics Canada, 2016

Source:

Immigrants arrive in Canada in better health than their Canadian-born counterparts. This is evidenced by 10 years of better health outcomes: lower rates of diabetes, hypertension, and perinatal complications, such as prematurity and low birth weights.

Source:

Statistics Canada, 2011

Century Initiative's policy positions and recommendations coming soon.
Urban development & infrastructure

Vibrant cities are beacons for people and ideas. To ensure our cities are able to accommodate current population levels and are poised for growth, we must invest in affordable housing, effective public transportation, overall infrastructure, and expansion to the near and far North.

Attracting more people to our cities allows us to share the cost of key services such as hospitals, roads, libraries, and policing across a larger tax base. There is evidence that higher density cities have a greater flow of ideas and people, and a lower carbon footprint.

Facts
source

Canada is one of the most urbanized countries in the world. Over 80% of Canadians live in cities.

Source:

Statistics Canada, 2014

Canadian transit systems require $4.2 billion per year to repair and replace existing assets. This excludes meeting unmet or future demands of residents.

Source:

McKinsey Global Institute, 2013

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce has estimated that congestion is costing the country $15 billion per year, equivalent to almost 1% of Canada’s GDP.

Source:

Canadian Infrastructure Report, 2016

Century Initiative's policy positions and recommendations coming soon.
Employment & entrepreneurship

A thriving domestic market benefits everyone. By supporting greater investment and research, tapping into our under-represented talent, and helping companies to grow from start-ups to multinational entities, we contribute to Canada’s economic might.

Facts
source

Canada’s expenditure on research and development is 1.69% of GDP, compared to the OECD average of 2.36%.

Source:

Statistics Canada, 2014

The combined value of the technology cluster in Toronto, Kitchener, and Waterloo is $9.9 billion. It is $410.9 billion in the Silicon Valley.

Source:

McKinsey Global Institute, 2013

Source:

The number of new businesses in Canada has declined steadily over the last 10 years.

Source:

Canadian Infrastructure Report, 2016

Century Initiative's policy positions and recommendations coming soon.
Early childhood supports

We want to support families in their choices to have children and to work productively. A revised family leave policy, a national daycare system, and quality education are critical to doing this well. This is especially important for new arrivals who may not have the same access to childcare options without a strong public system in place.

Facts
source

The median cost of full-time child care across Canada ranges from a low of $152 per month in Quebec to a high of $677 in Ontario.

Source:

Statistics Canada, 2014

The impact of $7-a-day child care in Quebec shows that women’s labour force participation is 8 to 12% higher than it would have otherwise been.

Source:

Fortin, Godbout & St-Cerny, 2012

Source:

Canada’s public spending on early childhood education is between 0.2% and 0.34% of GDP, less than half the OECD average.

Source:

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, 2014

Century Initiative's policy positions and recommendations coming soon.
Education

People are our future, and we need to invest in them. Strong schools are the way to do this. They attract and develop high-potential, highly-motivated people, both domestic and international. Education is the key to social mobility for all Canadians.

Facts
source

Half of Canadian STEM degrees are held by people who were not born in Canada.

Source:

Statistics Canada, 2011

Public funding for post-secondary education by the federal government accounts for an average of approximately 57% of university and college operating funding in Canada, down from 80% just two decades ago.

Source:

Statistics Canada, 2011

Century Initiative's policy positions and recommendations coming soon.
Immigration

Without immigration, Canada’s population will start to shrink in twenty years. As a result, it is not a question of whether, but how much immigration is appropriate. Canada already has a large number of immigrants, who are a source of economic strength and diversity. Our openness as a country is a competitive advantage, and it must remain that way for decades to come.

Facts
source

Historically, Canada has successfully supported very high levels of immigration. In 1913, 400,000 immigrants arrived in Canada, representing over 5.2% of the population at the time.

Source:

Citizenship and Immigration Canada

Immigrants to Canada are more likely to start and own businesses than those born in Canada.

Source:

Statistics Canada, 2016

Source:

Immigrants arrive in Canada in better health than their Canadian-born counterparts. This is evidenced by 10 years of better health outcomes – lower rates of diabetes, hypertension, and perinatal complications such as prematurity and low birth weights.

Source:

Statistics Canada, 2011

Urban development & infrastructure

Vibrant cities are beacons for people and ideas. To ensure our cities are able to accommodate current population levels and are poised for growth, we must invest in affordable housing, effective public transportation, overall infrastructure, and expansion to the near and far North.

Attracting more people to our cities allows us to share the cost of key services such as hospitals, roads, libraries, and policing across a larger tax base. There is evidence that higher density cities have a greater flow of ideas and people, and a lower carbon footprint.

Facts
source

Canada is one of the most urbanized countries in the world. Over 80% of Canadians live in cities.

Source:

Statistics Canada, 2014

Canadian transit systems require $4.2 billion per year to repair and replace existing assets. This excludes meeting unmet or future demands of residents.

Source:

McKinsey Global Institute, 2013

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce has estimated that congestion is costing the country $15 billion per year, equivalent to almost 1% of Canada’s GDP.

Source:

Canadian Infrastructure Report, 2016

Employment & entrepreneurship

A thriving domestic market benefits everyone. By supporting greater investment and research, tapping into our under-represented talent, and helping companies to grow from start-ups to multinational entities, we contribute to Canada’s economic might.

Facts
source

Canada’s expenditure on research and development is 1.69% of GDP, compared to the OECD average of 2.36%.

Source:

Statistics Canada, 2014

The combined value of the technology cluster in Toronto, Kitchener, and Waterloo is $9.9 billion. It is $410.9 billion in the Silicon Valley.

Source:

McKinsey Global Institute, 2013

The number of new businesses in Canada has declined steadily over the last 10 years.

Source:

Canadian Infrastructure Report, 2016

Early childhood supports

We want to support families in their choices to have children and to work productively. A revised family leave policy, a national daycare system, and quality education are critical to doing this well. This is especially important for new arrivals who may not have the same access to childcare options without a strong public system in place.

Facts
source

76% of Canadian women participate in the labour force compared to an OECD average of 64%.

Source:

OECD, 2013

The increase in the percentage of working women has been responsible for 1/3 of Canadian economic growth over the past 50 years.

Source:

Statistics Canada, 2016

The median cost of full-time child care across Canada ranges from a low of $152 per month in Quebec to a high of $677 in Ontario.

Source:

Statistics Canada, 2014

The impact of $7-a-day child care in Quebec shows that women’s labour force participation is 8 to 12% higher than it would have otherwise been.

Source:

Fortin, Godbout & St-Cerny, 2012

Canada’s public spending on early childhood education is (between 0.2% and 0.34% of GDP) less than half the OECD average.

Source:

Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, 2014

Education

People are our future, and we need to invest in them. Strong schools are the way to do this. They attract and develop high-potential, highly-motivated people, both domestic and international. Education is the key to social mobility for all Canadians.

Facts
source

Canadian scores in reading, mathematics, and science have been falling since 2003.

Source:

OECD, 2014

Half of Canadian STEM degrees are held by, people who were not born in Canada.

Source:

Statistics Canada, 2011

Public funding for post-secondary education by the federal government accounts for an average of approximately 57% of university and college operating funding in Canada, down from 80% just 2 decades ago.

Source:

Statistics Canada, 2011